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Timing Belt On 2011 Subaru Forester Timing Belt Or Chain ? Timing Belt On 2011 Forester With 97K Miles

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Is that true that all 2011 outbacks and foresters come with chain driven camshafts? Does the chain needs servicing/replacing like the old timing belts at about 100K miles?
All chains eventually stretch, all gears eventually wear. When it happens, I have no idea and did not read the manual since I do not plan on owning a car that gets to that mileage.
i dont think any of the outbacks have switched to the new motor, not even the 2012″sthey all still have the belts most chains have no replacement date, as the tensions take out what strech does develope
the totally redesigned 2.5 engine is chain driven. I really don”t understand this chain vs belt thing people have. Belts you replace at 105K – chains you go in and replace all the worn out bits and generally the chain given any failure at a high mileage point is a failure and will do the engine in chain or belt. No differenceThe reason an automaker like Subaru will move to chain is they can make the engine even more compact in size vs using a belt which needs more space to be properly run. The reason an auto maker will use a belt it costs less to do – is less noisy and space is not a big issue.

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2006 Outback wagon 2.5XT Limited: “Zoe”. 125K and counting. Yellow Lamin-X. Cobb AP. More to come.2006 Outback wagon 2.5i: “Sprout”. 106K and counting. HIR1 high beam upgrade.2002 Outback wagon 3.0 L.L. Bean no more: “Mal“. 145K and down for repairs. Mismatched cloth interior swap. HIR1 high beam upgrade. Yellow Lamin-X. Plenty of broken bits.Previous: 2003 Outback 2.5 AWP: “Kaylee”.

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Sold, last known at 210K. 1996 Legacy Outback 2.5: “Solstice”. Totaled at 115K.
Is that true that all 2011 outbacks and foresters come with chain driven camshafts? Does the chain needs servicing/replacing like the old timing belts at about 100K miles?
the totally redesigned 2.5 engine is chain driven. I really don”t understand this chain vs belt thing people have. Belts you replace at 105K – chains you go in and replace all the worn out bits and generally the chain given any failure at a high mileage point is a failure and will do the engine in chain or belt. No differenceThe reason an automaker like Subaru will move to chain is they can make the engine even more compact in size vs using a belt which needs more space to be properly run. The reason an auto maker will use a belt it costs less to do – is less noisy and space is not a big issue.
Honda has slowly moved their engines over to chains to make the high priced belt changes a thing of the past. At least that is my understanding. But it sounds like that chains are not quite the panacea they appear to be. So is there still a “recommended” time frame for the chain to be inspected and changed out?
Honda has slowly moved their engines over to chains to make the high priced belt changes a thing of the past. At least that is my understanding. But it sounds like that chains are not quite the panacea they appear to be. So is there still a “recommended” time frame for the chain to be inspected and changed out?
If you look at how much they are cramming into a transverse mounted engine bay I can promise you the reason Honda is going to chain is for space.As for when a chain driven engine should have the chain gear replaced? All depends on how well the timing chain and set up is designed. But the reality of it is the chain will in most cases far out last all the parts that hold it in place. If anyone of those parts fail after a decent number of miles it won”t matter if the chain is unbroken or not the end result is generally the same.
As alluded to, the chain is but one part. Peruse the 04/05 Nissan Quest chain-guide discussions.I’ve only had to replace a timing belt once (at 86K), because I replaced the water pump. And replaced the oil seals too at that time, good or bad – ie: go in once.Belt/chain, it doesn’t matter. I was inspecting the old T-Belt and the mechanic said it could’ve easily gone another 30K, I sold the car at 94K.
Other than the guide problems on the “01 and “02 H6 3.0 engines, has anyone ever had to replace a subaru chain or chain-driven water pump?Dave
per SUbaru, The Chain does not need to be replaced within the useful life of the car.(whatever that means). The belt need to be replaced at/around 105K miles. I had timing belt in most of previous car. Had a few broke on me (30K-40K miles past recommended replacement mileage, yes, I was not very good at following schedule plus I was a college student(broke) back then….) I have a timing chain car before. Nissan claimed you do NOT have to replace the timing belt within the life of the car. Sold the car at 165K miles to a family member. They keep that car for 2-3 more years and then sold it at close to 200K miles with the original timing chain still in the engine….YMMV.

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just reading up on the H6 and the timing chains… I am interested to go back to CNYDAVE”s question? Has anyone ever had a timing chain/associated parts or waterpump go on an 03+ H6??? ThanksJonathan

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My previous car was an “02 Outback H-6 3.0 VDC, and I had no problems related to the timing chain or waterpump. When I traded the car in, I had racked up ~102,000 miles on the odometer, and the only repair that was ever done was the replacement of the serpentine belt tensioner and idler pulley, as a result of their bearings going dry and becoming noisy.Subaru”s timing chain-equipped H-6 engines seem to be about as bullet-proof as an engine can be.
The longevity of timing chains is dependent on the design – generally speaking, the shorter the chain, the fewer issues that may develop with chain stretch, etc.Most (all?) American V-8 engines have always used chains, and they are essentially a non-issue with reliability. Partly this is due to the fact that with a typical OHV US V-8 engine design, there is a single cam nestled down in the V of the engine, and so the chain is very short.A counter-example is the old Mercedes 3.8 liter V-8 that was used in the early 80″s. As with other Mercedes V-8″s this is an overhead cam engine, and it used a single very long chain that wrapped around the crank, and the cams on both heads, etc. These were quite prone to failure, brought on by chain stretch that lead to the chain not staying seated in the sprockets. Plus, Mercedes used teflon-coated chain guides and tensioner, and after a while bits and pieces of the guides would fall off… Mercedes “solved” the problem by going to a double-row chain, for improved reliability. But even with the double-row chain, the prevailing wisdom on older Mercedes is still to change out the chain, guides, and tensioner every 100 to 120k miles – very unusual for an engine with a timing chain. (As an aside – chain tensioners don”t necessarily prevent all issues with chain stretch – if the spacing between individual links increases, you can still have trouble with the chain not sitting in the cogs properly.)The good news for the 3.6R engine is that it uses three relatively short chains, and not one long chain. If you browse through the “boxer engine” section of the “Why Subaru?” page on their web site, you can find a front view of all of the engines with the timing chain/belt covers removed. In the 3.6R engine, there is one very short chain that goes from the crank to an idler cog that sits below the crank. From this idler cog a second somewhat-longer chain (but still not THAT long) runs off to one head, and a third similar chain runs off to the other head. What you can”t tell from the picture is whether each chain is single-row or double-row. But in general it looks like a robust design, and I wouldn”t feel any need to worry about chain replacement, even for as long as 200k miles. Here is a link to the page with the pictures (near the bottom of page): Engine Comparison | Subaru Boxer Engine

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